Education and Humility

Education and humility are considered synonymous. It is taken for granted, as a natural assumption that education results in humility, that it helps you become a better person. That somehow, when you exit an educational institution, you are enlightened, empathetic, understanding and gentle but most of all, humble.

This assumption might have been true for the ancient period – the age of the gurukula system, I do not see that happening today. Education today deals with the creation of ego – the creation of a hierarchy, a hegemony. Humility is a joke and education a farce. I do not think we can find a solution for this sudden shift nor can we attempt at identifying one sole reason for it.

If I were to get into an institution hoping to learn life skills, I would be utterly disappointed. Although, me wanting to learn life skills from an institution itself would be ideal – the only point of me wanting to go to school or college is to acquire – no – learn to duplicate skills that other institutions consider necessary in order to be looked at as a “functional” human being.

I pretend to learn, to understand in order to be recruited for a job where I can pretend to work so that I earn enough money in order to pretend to enjoy my social life with the specific person that I will pretend to love for the rest of my life. My whole life revolves around pretension.

And how do I manage to ignore this seemingly established superficial outlook towards life? I pretend to be better than other people who are again pretending to be better than me. Gradually, this transcends into my reality, I begin to believe that I am better – I am no longer pretending – It becomes my reality. And where have I learnt to master this art of manipulating the divide between reality and illusion? In the educational institutions that I have attended.

My entrance to an institution is itself rooted in the assumption that the amount of money that I can spare for “pretending to learn” somehow makes me a better candidate to this particular institution than another person who cannot afford it. The course I choose to pursue also molds my ego. By choosing science, I am subjected to teachers and professors who themselves “pretend” to be better than the professors of Arts.

This situation is however, no better in the Arts field, we are taught to be snobs from the start – because we apparently have more knowledge of the world in all its intricacies when compared to our less fortunate colleagues. However, it is disheartening to see that all this knowledge does nothing to our overarching sense of self-importance. Nope, we walk with our heads high – noses pointed towards the sky with the misconception that we are better at life than anyone else alive.

It has been a very rare occurrence when I have seen a shred of humility among academicians and students. I have no hope in an education system where genuine questions (if any) are ostracized by sarcastic comebacks, honest effort is looked down upon, discipline is belittled, knowledge and humility are dethroned by presentation and pretentiousness, eagerness is defaced and apathy prevails.

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17 thoughts on “Education and Humility

  1. I am not aware that education and humility have ever been synonymous. Certainly in Christian history, it was certainly not the case… in fact it would be appear (in general) to be quite the opposite.
    As for education, our problem (as expressed by numerous others) is that we cannot predict what the world will be like in the next 15-20 years, and yet we have an education model which is designed to prepare young people them for the future! Then of course, as in every profession, there are many individuals who simply should consider a career change!
    Nobody should be surprised at the confusion over identities, of ones place in the world. Nobody should be surprised at the various medical conditions that emanate from poor self esteem.
    But… as always….criticisms are easy, but what are the solutions?

    Liked by 2 people

      1. Hypothetically, a more constant standard of living around the world could help in that there would be less envy. A better education program around the world could expose more peoples minds to the realities of life, and make them more understanding. A more consistent (and stronger) message from all the major religions in the area of giving, compassion and understanding could re-direct a lot of energy to more productive purposes. There’s always hope! 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

  2. Welcome back.

    Not everywhere it is same.
    Plus system is driven by people who are less skillful. If you come across a skillful and interested teacher, it all becomes a beautiful experience.

    Like

  3. It is not a surprise given that the world’s education system are almost all based on the industrial revolution idea of ‘churning out’ students at various stages as if on a factory workfloor. All education needs overhauling for this reason.

    The darker, more difficult area however, is that of society wanting to pretend. We chases paper dreams for no good reason and find ourselves more embittered as the years and decades go by. Yet we carry on this way. Why? Figure that out and you’re on your way to riches when you write a book about it – which ironically means you can buy any pretence you want…

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Education and humility are synonymous? What an interesting philosophy.
    Congratulations on being Danny Ray’s featured blogger. I met you on his site. I was his featured blogger too. Maybe you can check out my site if you need a blogging tip or too. That’s what I write about.
    Janice

    Liked by 1 person

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